Monday, 31 December 2018

Antimicrobial Therapy for Gum Disease

Below is an article written by by Tracey Sandilands and found on Colgate.com 

Antimicrobial therapy is a form of oral treatment used to eliminate or reduce the development of bacterial infections in the mouth. The therapy aims to prevent periodontal diseaseresulting from infections, which can cause painful, bleeding gums and loosening of your teeth.

Preparation and Treatment
If your dentist decides you will benefit from antimicrobial treatment, they will likely start with scaling and root planing. This process removes plaque and calculus (tartar) from the sulcus area around the teeth using either a scaler or instruments as well as an ultrasonic scaling device. In severe cases where there are periodontal pockets greater than 5-6 mm deep, the dentist may recommend that the patient be seen by a periodontist to evaluate the area with deeper pocketing and determine if gum surgery may be necessary. The scaling and root planing and gum surgery treatments require local anesthesia to reduce the patient's discomfort. The dental hygienist performs the scaling and root planing procedure.

During gum surgery, the periodontist makes an incision into the gum tissue, flaps the tissue back and cleans and scales the surface of the affected teeth and bone to remove the diseased tissue and infection. The gum tissue is then put back in place and sutured and the gum tissue will heal, and the periodontist will check the area a week or so after surgery. The use of an antiseptic mouthwash or antibiotic medication may be recommended for the next seven to 10 days.

Antiseptic Mouthwashes
Mouthwashes containing antiseptic ingredients help control the reproduction of the bacteria, which grow on the gum tissue in the mouth, and help to clean out the pockets around the individual teeth. The ingredients in antiseptic mouthwashes may include chlorhexidine, essential oils, and metal salts Sn11 and Zn11 to help control dental plaque and halitosis.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Antibiotic Medications
  • After Treatment

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Monday, 24 December 2018

What Is the Best Age for Braces?

Below is an article written by by Steve Auger and found on Colgate.com 

Responsible parents always want what is best for their children, even if the kids don't see it that way. That means yearly physicals, regular dental checkups and an orthodontist appointment if you suspect your child needs braces. While you're preparing for the visit, brush up on the best age for braces.

What Do Braces Do?
Orthodontic treatment solves multiple mouth issues. Some of those issues include teeth crowding, missing or extra teeth, tooth spacing and improper bites. Orthodontic issues are referred to as malocclusions. Malocclusions that aren't fixed can cause problems down the line, including worn enamel, tooth decay and issues with chewing and speaking.

First Visit to the Orthodontist
The American Association of Orthodontists recommends scheduling a child's first orthodontist visit by age 7 or at the first visible sign of a malocclusion. At that age, the child's teeth and jaw are still developing, making orthodontic issues, such as tooth crowding, easier to address.
Your child might be a bit apprehensive about the visit. A good orthodontist will take measures to put your child at ease, like giving them an office tour and introducing them to the staff. Once your child is more relaxed, the orthodontist can conduct the initial exam to determine if treatment is needed. Photographs and X-rays of the mouth and teeth will be taken to help the orthodontist decide how to proceed.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Types of Misalignment
  • Adapting to Braces
  • Not Just for Children

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Sunday, 9 December 2018

6 MouthHealthy Holiday Snacks (That Are Almost Too Cute to Eat) (3 of 3)

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Sweet as the holidays may be, sugar-packed treats can wreak havoc on your pearly whites. This season, ring in the festivities with healthy and fun holiday snack options that fill your mouth with joy.

Pita Tree Appetizers








The low-fat sour cream in this recipe is a source of vitamin D, which strengthens bones and teeth.
Get the recipe >> 

Grinch Poppers













Be good for goodness sake to your teeth with these Grinch Poppers. For a healthier and more MouthHealthy alternative, swap the sugary and sticky marshmallow for another piece of banana. 
Get the recipe >>

To read the entire article with all healthy snacks please visit MouthHealthy.org

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Sunday, 2 December 2018

6 MouthHealthy Holiday Snacks (That Are Almost Too Cute to Eat) (2 of 3)

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Sweet as the holidays may be, sugar-packed treats can wreak havoc on your pearly whites. This season, ring in the festivities with healthy and fun holiday snack options that fill your mouth with joy.

Black Olive Penguins










These penguins will waddle their way into your heart - especially because they’re filled with cream cheese, which has calcium. 
Get the recipe >>

Cheesy Reindeer













Rich in calcium, cheese is always a MouthHealthy favorite. To get perfectly round eyes and noses, the author of this recipe used a juice box-sized straw to cut round pieces of black olive and a larger straw for the red pepper nose.
Get the recipe >> 

To read the entire article with all healthy snacks please visit MouthHealthy.org

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Sunday, 25 November 2018

6 MouthHealthy Holiday Snacks (That Are Almost Too Cute to Eat) (1 of 3)

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Sweet as the holidays may be, sugar-packed treats can wreak havoc on your pearly whites. This season, ring in the festivities with healthy and fun holiday snack options that fill your mouth with joy.

Egg Snowmen
 









These adorable snowmen - made with hard-boiled eggs, carrots and peppercorns - will melt your heart before melting in your mouth. Eggs are a source of Vitamin D, which is needed to help absorb, carry and deposit calcium in the bone that supports your teeth. Carrots - which are crunchy, firm and full of water - help to scrub your teeth clean like a natural toothbrush.
Get the recipe >> 

Spinach Artichoke Frittata Trees











You won’t need to cut down on these trees! Dairy products like milk contain calcium, eggs are a source of Vitamin D and leafy greens like spinach are an excellent source of vitamins and minerals. (Just be sure to floss before flashing a smile beneath the mistletoe!) 
Get the recipe >> 

To read the entire article with all healthy snacks please visit MouthHealthy.org

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Thursday, 8 November 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Braces or Canker Sore

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Braces
Braces are delicate, and any foods that are sticky, chewy or hard can easily cause them to break, including:

  • ice
  • nuts
  • popcorn
  • hard candy
  • gum

Any food that you need to bite into to eat is prime for breaking braces. You can get around this by cutting the food, such as corn off the cob or rib meat off the bone, or slicing apples and chopping carrots into small, bite-size pieces. You may also experience problems eating after your braces are tightened-teeth may feel sore. The first few days are the worst, so try eating softer foods like those listed below until the soreness passes:

  • scrambled eggs
  • oatmeal
  • soup with soft vegetables or pureed or cream soups
  • soft cheeses, including cottage cheese
  • smoothies and milkshakes

Canker Sores
There is no cure for canker sores but you may be able to reduce how often you get them by avoiding foods that irritate your mouth. Spicy foods, acidic foods like pickles and sauerkraut, and citrus fruits can cause irritation. If you have canker sores, help ease discomfort by eating bland foods until your sores heal, such as: 

  • low-fat milk and other dairy foods
  • cooked, canned and frozen vegetables
  • mashed potatoes (fortify by mixing in powdered milk to boost nutrition)
  • cooked or canned fruit, including applesauce
  • hot cereals like oatmeal and cream of wheat (make with milk instead of water to boost nutrition)

If you get mouth sores, try these tips to make eating easier and speed healing:

  • Choose cool or room temperature foods.
  • Blend and moisten dry or solid foods.
  • Drink through a straw to bypass mouth sores. 
  • Eat high protein, high calorie foods to speed up healing time. For example, add protein powder to milk shakes or powdered dry milk to fortify mashed potatoes and soups.

The lists above are partial, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Thursday, 1 November 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Dry Mouth or Oral Surgery & Implants

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Dry Mouth
Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. If you have dry mouth, talk to your dentist or doctor. Dry mouth can be a sign of certain diseases or can be caused by certain medications or the result of medical treatments. If you have dry mouth:

  • don’t use tobacco or drink alcohol 
  • drink water regularly-with and between meals
  • avoid drinks that contain caffeine such as colas, coffee and tea since it can dry out your mouth
  • chew sugarless gum or suck on sugarless candy to stimulate saliva flow 
  • avoid spicy or salty foods if they cause pain in your mouth
  • moisten dry foods with soup, broth, gravy, butter or margarine, or sauce. Dip or soak your food in what you’re drinking.

Oral Surgery and Implants
Your nutrition and dietary needs following oral surgery or getting implants depends on factors including your nutritional status prior to your procedure, the extent of your procedure, how much impact there is on oral function and how long your recovery is expected to last. A liquid or soft foods diet may be required for a few days or longer, until your mouth heals. Opt for nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods and lean meats, eggs and beans whenever possible since they provide vitamins, minerals and nutrients needed for healing, including zinc, protein, and vitamins A and C.
Try these foods:

  • scrambled eggs 
  • oatmeal or cream of wheat (make with milk instead of water to boost nutrition) 
  • soup with soft vegetables or pureed or cream soups
  • soft cheeses, including cottage cheese
  • smoothies and milkshakes 

The lists above are parital, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Overcoming Dental Anxiety

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about overcoming dental anxiety.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Thursday, 25 October 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Problems Chewing or Swallowing

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Problems Chewing
Chewing problems may be caused by tooth loss, gum disease, cavities and ill-fitting dentures, so your first step should be a visit to your dentist to help determine the cause of your problem. Meanwhile, eating soft foods (see tips for braces) can you help maintain your nutrients until you can see your dentist.

Problems Swallowing
Swallowing problems can occasionally happen, but if it persists, talk to your doctor since it could be related to something serious. Causes of swallowing issues vary and treatment depends on what is causing the problem. 

If you are having trouble swallowing, to prevent choking and aspiration avoid these foods:

  • alcoholic beverages
  • extremely hot foods and beverages
  • caffeine
  • spicy foods
  • popcorn

Depending on level of swallowing difficulty, the following foods may be included in the diet. These foods are grouped into four different categories:

  • Thin liquids that dissolve quickly in the mouth such as frozen yogurt, ice cream, gelatin and broth.
  • Nectar-like liquids where liquid coats and drips off a spoon such as nectars, milkshakes, cream soup and vegetable juices. 
  • Honey-like liquids that flow off a spoon in a ribbon like in yogurt, tomato sauce and honey.
  • Spoon-thick liquids that are thickened to pudding consistency such as pudding, custard or hot cereal. 

The lists above are partial, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Dental Check-ups

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about dental check-ups!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Thursday, 18 October 2018

Emergency Dentistry

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Emergency Dentistry!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Sunday, 7 October 2018

Why Are My Teeth Sensitive to Sugar?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com 

Do you have a sweet tooth, but cringe in pain every time you enjoy a sweet treat? If you have teeth sensitive to sugar, you may wonder if there’s any way to get relief. This likely means that the enamel of your teeth is damaged, and is making your teeth sensitive to sweets and other foods. Fortunately, for those whose teeth are sensitive to sugar, there are solutions to help you enjoy your favorite foods and avoid discomfort. 

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:


Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Tuesday, 2 October 2018

Dental Assistant

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by your Dental Assistant!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Sunday, 30 September 2018

What are Wisdom Teeth? Purpose, Symptoms & When They Come In

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com

Wisdom teeth grow in at the back of the mouth, behind your molars. There is a set on the bottom as well as the top. Wisdom teeth often grow in crooked, sideways, or otherwise misaligned. As they grow in, they can push on other teeth, causing problems of overcrowding and misalignment for them as well.

Function and Purpose of Wisdom Teeth
Wisdom teeth are believed to be "evolutionary relics," and were helpful to our distant ancestors who ate diets that consisted of rougher foods like sticks and reed plants. As teeth wore down or fell out, wisdom teeth provided replacements. Nowadays, with modern advancements in oral hygiene and softer diets, we don’t need these replacement teeth, but they still grow in. Essentially, our mouths can hold 28 teeth, but including wisdom teeth, we have about 32 teeth all vying for space. Wisdom teeth symptoms such as overcrowding, bone and nerve damage, infection, etc. can all result.

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:


Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Tuesday, 25 September 2018

Dental Hygienist

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by your Dental Hygienist!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Sunday, 23 September 2018

Toothache: Home Remedies, Causes, Relief for Sore Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com

Common Toothache Causes
Are you wondering why your teeth hurt? If you have aching teeth, it may be due to a dental problem such as cavities, gum disease, bruxism, TMJ or a non-dental problem, such as a sinus infection or even stress.

  1. Sensitive Teeth: Some types of toothache pain occur if you are using dental care products like peroxide-based whitening agents that penetrate into your teeth causing tooth sensitivity.
  2. Bruxism: If you have aching teeth with no signs of tooth decay or gum disease, you may be experiencing bruxism. Bruxism is the technical term for grinding your teeth. Bruxism is a common cause of aching teeth that affects millions of people of all ages in the United States. If you experience aching teeth and other symptoms of bruxism, see a dental professional as soon as possible. If left untreated, chronic tooth grinding can damage crowns and fillings, and wear away tooth enamel, putting your teeth at increased risk for infection or decay. Causes of bruxism that lead to aching teeth include crooked teeth, poor jaw alignment, and stress or anxiety. If bruxism is due to misaligned teeth, straightening your bite with orthodontia could help solve the problem. But if bruxism is due to chronic stress, stress management techniques may be needed to help relieve your aching teeth. Your dental professional may recommend a mouth guard to wear at night to help prevent tooth pain associated with bruxism.
  3. Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Dysfunction: If you're stressed to the point of clenching your jaw and grinding your teeth, you can develop tooth pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is the joint that hinges the lower jaw to the skull, enabling you to eat and talk. Clenching your jaw and grinding your teeth put additional stress on the muscles of the jaw, which can cause tooth pain. If your tooth pain is caused by TMJ syndrome, your dentist may recommend a TMJ dental splint to reposition the lower jaw. But in less serious cases, warm compresses applied to the jaw, eating soft foods, and taking measures to reduce stress can help.
  4. Damaged Teeth: Your toothache pain could be caused by a cracked or broken tooth. If this is the cause of your pain, see your dentist as soon as possible. A broken tooth can contribute to tooth decay.
  5. Decayed Teeth: Tooth decay is one of the most common causes of toothache pain. Tooth decay occurs when acids from plaque bacteria penetrate into the tooth enamel causing a loss of tooth mineral which, if it progresses, can ultimately cause pain in the tooth’s inner layer, the pulp.

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:
Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Tuesday, 18 September 2018

Dentist: Doctors of Oral Health

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by Dentists!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Saturday, 8 September 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 3 of 3)

Don’t replace fillings just because they’re old 
 










When you have a cavity, the dentist removes it and puts in a filling. These fillings can last for many years, but some people get silver fillings removed because they don’t like the color. However, the process of removing a filling can weaken the tooth. Additionally, insurance may not cover the removal. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Saturday, 1 September 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 2 of 3)

Ask about all the options for calming your child during dental procedures 











Dental work can be scary for some kids. Talk with your dentist about ways to help your child stay calm. Tips for a successful dental visit can include making sure your child is not hungry before their dental appointment and scheduling an appointment at the proper time of day.

For jaw pain, try conservative treatments first 











Jaw pain can be caused by stress, arthritis or an injury. A treatment plan for jaw pain should first consist of actions like exercises and anti-inflammatory drugs.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Diet & Your Teeth

Learn more about the connection between your teeth and what you eat.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Saturday, 25 August 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 1 of 3)

Use toothpaste with fluoride for infants and children 











For children younger than 3 years, you should begin brushing a child’s teeth with fluoride toothpaste in an amount no larger than a grain of rice. For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.

Consider sealants to prevent decay or treat beginning cavities on the back teeth 











Dental sealants act as a barrier to prevent cavities. They are a plastic material applied by a dentist to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay occurs most often.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Lifestyle & Your Oral Health

Learn more about how your lifestyle can affect your oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net